Far From Home

by New Nervous Kind

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The time to start a musical project should probably have been in a university where access to a range of different musicians was abundant. But then most people choose to learn the hard way…

The New Nervous Kind was created in the wake of the university with nothing more than a laptop (to program drums), a guitar, and a bass guitar, with the help of a trusty microphone. The setting was an isolated attic space, far from friends or family, which would serve well as the basis for the nostalgic lyrics and mechanical quality for our first single “Going Nowhere.”

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Music is my Life

by Vugatti Beyron

Music is my Life by Vugatti Beyron

Born and bred in Bristol, UK, I have always been surrounded by music. My father is a guitarist and always listens to Iron Maiden and Black Sabbath. My mother is not a musician, but she always listens to AC/DC and Billy Idol. At age 8, I started playing guitar. I am now 19 and have made guitar my main instrument, but I can also play drums. Last year, however, my musical journey nearly ended.

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Tuesday Atlas: The Ghost in Your Attic

by Tuesday Atlas

Tuesday Atlas: The Ghost in Your Attic


What do you get when you combine the funky bass lines of the Chili Peppers, the haunting vocals of Nirvana, the screeching leads of Buckethead, the beefy guitars of Basement, and the powerful rumble of Balance and Composure drumming? A cacophony of styles and tastes blend into a unique representation of alternative rock music in the form of Tuesday Atlas. We just like to make songs that get stuck in your head, like a ghost in your attic.

Listen to the album while reading the text.

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Heartfelt and Light-Hearted

by Al Barnes

Heartfelt and Light-Hearted by Al Barnes
I grew up in a small town in Minnesota called Elbow Lake. There wasn’t a whole lot to do in the “sticks” of MN, so I found love in rock ‘n’ roll at an early age through my older brother’s music collection. He moved out when I was young, joined the Air Force and was stationed in England when I was in middle school, so our family took a trip overseas to see him. When I got there, he showed me his electric guitar. I picked it up, and he showed me a couple of licks. I played that damn thing the rest of the time I was there. My parents heard me playing it the whole weekend and later that year, for Xmas, I got my first guitar. I was obsessed. I quit all sports and just focused on that.

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Music, Good For The Brain

by Limbic

Music, Good For The Brain by Limbic
Hi we’re Limbic, yes we’re named after the limbic system in your brain. The limbic system processes your emotions and memories, two things we believe music heavily influences.

Coming from the north-east of England we found ourselves in a local gigging scene oversaturated with your stereotypical indie bands, a cliché we never wanted to find ourselves landing in. Looking for an original sound to our area we created Limbic. An alt-experimental band that utilises synth to create a balance between your traditional indie band and the whacky world of synth sounds.

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Truths that no one wants to see

by Pablo Drexler

Truths that no one wants to see by Pablo Drexler
For me making music has always been about finding hidden lumps of pain, lighting fire to them and watching them disperse into the ether…

WEIGHTLESS/SINKING is the sonic representation of one of the most confusing periods of my life: I was simultaneously getting to grips with how much I had suffered from / attempted to forget the fact that one of my parents is a double cancer survivor, helping my family move out of my childhood home and trying to find my place in the mind-boggling metropolis that is London. I thought that the paradox of feeling like I was weightless yet at the same time sinking perfectly described the emotional soup I was in.

(I’m) a sparrow’s feather
on a lake: weightless/sinking

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Music Is A Staple

by Gretchen Pleuss

Music Is A Staple by Gretchen Pleuss

Photo by Thornburg Creative

Much of my childhood is hazy in my memory because of its ever-shifting nature. The one thing that I can still recall with rather unhindered detail is finding my voice as an artist even when life itself was uncertain.

When my parents split, it was messy. The house foreclosed, my mom and I moved in with my grandparents four hours north, and my two older sisters stayed in Cincinnati with my dad. As my mom struggled to find a job and a sense of new permanence in Akron, my aunts and grandparents stepped up and helped with caretaking duties. I was eight or nine years old.

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