My crazy adventure as a street musician: a life-changing year

by Iris Johner

My crazy adventure as a street musician: a life-changing year by Iris Johner
It’s lost and heavy-hearted that I decided to settle down on my own in south Portugal in November 2017. After three years of travels around the world and a summer back to my hometown realizing time was flying and driving my dreams away from me, it appeared to be the perfect deal for a start over – as the one place I would most likely call home.

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1 Cabin, 1 Mic, 1 Guitar, 1 Week

by Jack Norton

1 cabin, 1 mic, 1 guitar, 1 week by Jack Norton
I, Jack Norton, am an Emmy Award winning singer-songwriter performing hokum blues and vaudeville folk music. Based in the United States, I recorded my most recent album “Busker’s Blues” in a cabin in a remote part of Manitoba, Canada. Armed only with a mic, a guitar and a week in the woods, the following is a journal kept by me while recording…

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Fruits of the Cold or Narth Gazath’s Media Tales

by Common Ground

Fruits of the Cold or Narth Gazath's Media Tales by Common Ground
Narth said that one day the machine asked him a question: “why do you trust anything I tell you?” He said that at first he was pretty taken aback, I think I would have been too. As he went about his day, he said that the question was always there, in the back of his mind, a distant orbit. Eventually, he returned to the machine, to try and understand why it had asked him that question.

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Starting a revolution through music

by Lee Brickley

Starting a revolution through music by Lee Brickley
Are you sick and tired of war, inequality, racism, and injustice? Me too, and that’s why I write revolutionary protest songs. I wish I knew how to do more, but for now, I’m trying to make people think with my music because that’s what I do best.

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Pitch Black Noise: How I Learned to Write Lyrics

by Anna Brooks

Pitch Black Noise: How I Learned to Write Lyrics
In the first grade, I carried history books around like spell books. There was this magic about language that I felt compelled to keep close, like it had secret powers that I didn’t have access to yet. Clinging to an impressive-looking pile of books every day at school was also how I prevented my classmates from realizing I couldn’t read.

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