The Town and The City

by Daniel Armstrong

The Town and The City by Daniel Armstrong
Hailing from the town of Nottingham, England, I relocated to London in 2014. Gigging consistently solo and with various outfits such as Never Never Man and Frankie Teardrop Dead, I found time to begin working with producer Gavin Bowers (Elêphant, Tsuki) on the record in the fall of 2017. Collaborating with a host of different musicians on the album, I wanted to ensure that each track on my album ’The Town and The City’ was as varied as the settings that inspired the songs themselves.

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Gravedigging In Reverse

by Satyr

Gravedigging In Reverse by Satyr Syndicate Records
Satyr Syndicate Records is my project to re-record and master much of the music I have written. On the website, I play the part of Hermes, the messenger god. Hermes gives updates on how the excavations are going. Sometimes, there is drama with the bands. For example, there was a socialist funk band, called Smashpattern, who only put out a single EP, and then tragically disappeared into the jungles fighting for liberation. Satyr Syndicate is the group of satyrs who write, record and perform the songs. They represent various moods or genres. There is also the imagery of excavation and of Hades. Since I am re-recording, I am excavating stuff that was done long ago, like an archeological dig. Hades represents the other-world or sub-conscious, from which the music comes. Gravedigging in reverse.

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Travel through the Night

by Johnny Dell’Orso

Moonshine Effect: Travel through the Night by Johnny Dell'Orso
Moonshine Effect travel through the night in a psychedelic mood, humming dream pop melodies. They enjoy riding into pink moons on dancing horses and whispering folk sounds in the cool early morning breeze. They insist on watching the constellations of trembling blue stars, gently screaming their poetry till it touches the sky.

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Blik & Sand: Writing love songs

by Christopher Blicher

Blik & Sand: Writing love songs by Christopher Blicher
Love songs have been done to death. They are not new. But do they necessarily have to be all-in on either the sugar-sweet and romantic side or the heavily emotional and melancholic breakup side?

Can’t they be written in a detached way seen through glasses of the harsh conditions of reality? With a sarcastic and humorous tone? With a hint of cynicism? Even about objects instead of people? Can’t the story behind be as interesting as the emotions?

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Two Junkies

by Jade Steven

Burnt Toast Cosmonauts’ Two Junkies by Jade Steven
So when I was living in Lakewood, CO and I was beginning to write what would end up being Burnt Toast Cosmonaut’s self-titled album. I was getting a lot of my first shows in Colorado even though they were just acoustic gigs I was taking a lot of pride in what I was I doing. At this time I was working at this nursing home because at the time I was a CNA, which in and of itself was incredibly rewarding. But any who one day this just super cute mousy girl Shelbe started working with us.

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Tracing Faces: The Power of Music

by Tracing Faces

Tracing Faces: The Power of Music
Why do you enjoy music? Is it the compelling lyrics, catchy melodies, or addictive rhythm? We are Tracing Faces, and we believe that every song is an opportunity to change a life for the better. Music is an incredibly powerful form of art, and with every lyric, melody, and rhythm we write we are striving to produce emotional content for you to blast in the car, listen through your headphones at night, or scream out loud at live shows.

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Music is dying. Long live The MIK!

by Xavier Xisto

Music is dying. Long live The MIK! by Xavier Xisto
Music is dying. Slowly, but it is. I don’t want to be one of those close-minded people who lives in the glorious pinnacle of the past, but we can all agree that the quality of the music industry has declined intensely since the second half of the past century. Today’s standards of what is labeled as art are worrying. Why do we live in such an artistic wasteland, you might ask?

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